Thursday, 6 July 2017

THE COMPARISON OF ACCURACY BETWEEN WINNING AND LOSING IN SILAT 28th 2015 SEA GAMES SINGAPORE



Shapie, M. N. M (1,2) & Che Ramli, M.A. (1)

1. Fakulti Sains Sukan dan Rekreasi, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor.

2. Pertubuhan Seni Gayung Fatani Malaysia


ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to describe the accuracy among Indonesian Silat’s team during Sea Games 2015. A video recording from www.youtube.com during the match was use for the analysis. The skills outcome into three categories, which is hit target, hit elsewhere, and miss opponent. Independent sample t-test used to analyse the data between winner and loser. Through this studies, the result shows that the accuracy of Men’s class A accuracy is higher than Men’s class D which higher percentage on hit elsewhere and miss opponent.
Keyword: kicking, martial arts, coaching, performance analysis





Introduction

            Accuracy or precision is the ability to accurately attack an opponent and precisely hit the body to get point. In silat, accuracy is one of the most important aspects. Accuracy is also what makes the difference between winning and losing in a silat tanding match. Besides that, other silat component is the efficiency entry system. It is one of the technique that able you to move fast and accurately to approach the opponent. Furthermore, other silat component is the accurateness of follow-up techniques. The system allows accurate punching and kicking techniques. Accurate finishing techniques are more effective in immobilizing the opponent.

            The purpose of this research is to determine the comparison of accuracy between winning and losing in silat 28th 2015 SEA GAMES in Singapore. In order to obtain valid data, it is needed to use a high quality and empirically tested instrument. The purpose of this instrument is to measure the attacking accuracy of the fighters. Based on the video, the score is taken based on the accuracy of fighters that hit the target. In conclusion, the accuracy of the fighter is what determines the winner and loser of the match.





Materials and method

Match analysis 



            A video recording that is publicly available that shows two male silat match at the 28th SEA Games Singapore 2015 was used for analysis purposes. The first male match was a semi-final and final of men tanding class B of the 55kg weight category. The second male match was a semi-final and final of men tanding class E of the 70kg weight category. The system was used to identify 14 different types of event performed by the two male contestants as well as the start and end of action periods.


            Video were played at a slower rate of 50% and shown in sequences that were repeated to allow an accurate measurement of each of the offensive and defensive movement category. The video were paused and played again to ease the analysis. The commencement and completion of each individual action period was recorded and the duration was calculated. The frequency, mean duration and percentage of total time were subsequently calculated


 


Motion categories

            In silat, movement are categorize into 14 different silat exponent’s motion and are define a follow:

1)     Punch

2)     Kick

3)     Block

4)     Catch

5)     Topple

6)     Sweep

7)     Evade/Dodge

8)     Self-Release

9)     Block and Punch

10) Block and Kick

11) Block and Sweep

12) Fake Punch

13) Fake Kick

14) Others

 

 

Statistical analysis:
The data that has been observed is frequenly counted, observational research uses a method of recording which the recording records each occurrence clearly defined behaviour within a certain time frame. All the raw data generated by the recording are taken note and then transferred into SPSS for more detailed analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Scientists, version 14.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL).





















Results
Match 1 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class E (Final) Vietnam vs Malaysia
Vietnam (red)
Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
10
5
0
Kick
9
8
11
Topple
0
9
0
Sweep
0
2
0
Evade
2
0
0
Block
3
0
0
Catch
6
0
0
Self-Release
0
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
0
0
25
Fake Punch
0
0
8
Other
0
0
0
Total
30
24
44

Malaysia (Blue)
Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
0
0
0
Kick
8
6
3
Topple
6
0
0
Sweep
0
9
1
Evade
8
0
0
Block
2
0
0
Catch
9
0
0
Self-Release
0
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
0
0
6
Fake Punch
0
0
8
Other
0
0
0
Total
33
15
18


   
Table 1.0
Group Statistics

group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
score
Malaysia
3
23.3333
11.93035
6.88799
Vietnam
3
35.0000
10.14889
5.85947

Match 2 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class E (Semi Final) Singapore vs Malaysia
Singapore (Red)

Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
3
2
6
Kick
1
7
15
Topple
6
0
0
Sweep
2
0
2
Evade
5
0
0
Block
6
0
0
Catch
4
0
1
Self-Release
2
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
11
0
0
Fake Punch
3
0
0
Other
3
0
1
Total
46
9
25


Malaysia (Blue)
Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
2
0
5
Kick
0
9
8
Topple
1
2
0
Sweep
3
0
0
Evade
12
0
0
Block
8
0
0
Catch
7
0
1
Self-Release
1
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
4
0
0
Fake Punch
6
0
0
Other
6
1
0
Total
50
12
14
Table 2.0



Group Statistics

group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
score
Malaysia
3
25.3333
21.38535
12.34684
Singapore
3
26.6667
18.55622
10.71344

Match 3 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class B (Semi Final) Malaysia vs Vietnam
Malaysia (Red)


Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
7
0
2
Kick
0
3
1
Topple
3
0
0
Sweep
2
1
0
Evade
2
0
0
Block
4
0
0
Catch
7
0
1
Self-Release
0
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
1
0
0
Fake Punch
2
0
0
Other
2
0
0
Total
30
4
4


Vietnam (Blue)
Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
9
6
3
Kick
2
6
2
Topple
3
0
0
Sweep
0
1
0
Evade
0
0
0
Block
1
0
0
Catch
2
0
0
Self-Release
1
1
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
4
0
0
Fake Punch
1
0
0
Other
4
0
0
Total
27
14
5
Table 3.0


Group Statistics

group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
score
Malaysia
3
12.6667
15.01111
8.66667
Vietnam
3
15.3333
11.06044
6.38575
Match 4 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class B (Final) Malaysia vs Thailand
Malaysia (Blue)


Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
6
3
4
Kick
1
4
2
Topple
0
0
0
Sweep
1
1
3
Evade
4
0
0
Block
3
0
1
Catch
6
1
0
Self-Release
0
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
4
0
0
Fake Punch
8
0
0
Other
8
0
0
Total
41
9
10

Thailand (Red)
Notation
Hit Target
Hit Elsewhere
Miss Target
Punch
13
1
1
Kick
3
6
7
Topple
1
0
0
Sweep
0
1
0
Evade
2
0
1
Block
1
0
0
Catch
1
0
0
Self-Release
3
0
0
Block & Punch
0
0
0
Block & Kick
0
0
0
Block & Sweep
0
0
0
Fake Kick
5
0
0
Fake Punch
14
0
0
Other
16
0
0
Total
59
8
9
Table 4.0

Group Statistics

group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
score
Malaysia
3
20.0000
18.19341
10.50397
Thailand
3
25.3333
29.16048
16.83581



Discussion

        
    Based on the data from table 1.0, the data of the frequency and outcomes recorded is from Match 1 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class E (Final) Vietnam vs Malaysia. In this match, Malaysian fighter won the match. This is because of the accuracy of the fighter successfully hitting the target on the opponent. Based on the table, Malaysian fighter produced 50% of accurate attacking that hit the target. Whereas, Vietnam fighter only produced 30% of accurately attack to the Malaysian fighter. This is one of the reason Malaysian 


fighter won.
            Based on the data from table 2.0, the data of the frequency and outcomes recorded is from Match 2 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class E (Semi Final) Singapore vs Malaysia. In this match, Malaysian fighter produced 65% meanwhile the Singaporean fighter only produced 57% accuracy. In this match 2, the Malaysian fighter won.
               Based on table 3.0 shows the frequency of action and outcomes recorded during the Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class B (Semi Final) Malaysia vs Vietnam. In this game, Malaysian fighter produced 78% higher percentage of accuracy in the match that allow him to win. However, Vietnam fighter only 58% accuracy that made him lose the match.
               For the Match 4 Pencak Silat Tanding Men Class B (Final) Malaysia vs Thailand, this match was won by the Malaysian fighter. Looking at the accuracy of the Thailand fighter, which he produced 76% meanwhile the Malaysian fighter only produced 68% accuracy. Looking at the percentage of the Thailand fighter produced, he should have won. But from the other side, he made too much unforced error which cost him the match. The unforced error he made, made him lose points and lose the match to the Malaysian fighters.
            In conclusion, from all the data collected above, we can make a conclusion that accuracy is an important aspect in this Silat Tanding match. The more accurate the attacks, the more point the fighter win. The higher the accuracy, the higher percentage the fighter to win the match.

                                                                                                                                                    

 
Conclusions
 
            The purpose of this research is to determine the comparison of accuracy between winning and losing in silat 28th 2015 SEA GAMES in Singapore. In silat, accuracy is one of the most important aspects. Accuracy is also what makes the difference between winning and losing in a silat tanding match. Accurate finishing techniques are more effective in immobilizing the opponent. In the first match, Malaysian fighter produced 50% of accurate attacking that hit the target. Whereas, Vietnam fighter only produced 30% of accurately attack to the Malaysian fighter. In the second match, Malaysian fighter produced 65% meanwhile the Singaporean fighter only produced 57% accuracy. In the third match, Malaysian fighter produced 78% higher percentage of accuracy in the match that allow him to win. However, Vietnam fighter only 58% accuracy that made him lose the match. In the last match, the accuracy of the Thailand fighter, which he produced 76% meanwhile the Malaysian fighter only produced 68% accuracy.
            In conclusion, based on the data and report given above, we can conclude that accuracy is important to win the match. But as we can see, we can’t only focus on one aspect. We need to see other aspect such as speed and reaction time.
.          





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Recommendation

            In my recommendation, training reorganizing should not only focus on one aspect. This is because the  factors  influencing the  athlete  condition  are  internal  factor  and  external  factor. In other words, the influential thing to attain achievement is not only the physical condition but also other significant elements. Training should also focus on upper and lower body training such as punching and kicking technique. When the basic techniques are improved, other elements such as accuracy and speed can be improved. The faster and the more accurate the fighter can produce, the higher the percentage the fighter will have. This will allow him to be a complete fighter.